Seabin our Salvation

The Seabin Project is a recent Kickstarter project founded by two surfers in the hopes to remove litter from our oceans one pump at a time, but what’s spurred them on to do this?

It’s estimated that by 2050 there will be more plastic than fish in the sea with one refuse truck’s worth of plastic is dumped into the sea every minute. The rate at which we’re trashing our seas is quite frankly appalling; we’re treating our oceans like our own personal rubbish bin, with around 80 percent of marine litter originating on land with most of that being plastic. This immense amount of land originating litter is causing huge problems, with marine life eating our plastics and thus dying from choking, intestinal blockage and starvation. Microbeads too are toxic sponges and are being consumed by marine life. This means that consumed toxins inevitably make their way up the food chain which could lead to disastrous consequences for human health.

So how does Seabin help with our current and very real pollution and littering issue?

“The Seabin project have designed and made an automated rubbish bin that catches floating rubbish, oil, fuel and detergents. It’s designed for floating docks in the water of marinas, private pontoons, inland waterways, residential lakes, harbours, water ways, ports and yacht clubs and can even be fitted to super yachts and motor yachts!”

This means that any litter that gets dragged into our harbours, marinas or yacht clubs will be sucked into the newly designed rubbish bin that works through a pump system. The fact they can even be fitted to super and motor yachts means that boats can even pick up rubbish whilst sailing the ocean! However, marine ports are the best place to start situating the Seabins as they’re controlled environments with wind currents constantly bringing in rubbish from further out. But how does it logistically work?

“The Seabin is situated at the water’s surface and is plumbed into a shore based water pump on the dock. The water gets sucked into the Seabin bringing all floating debris and floating liquids into the Seabin. We catch all the floating debris inside the Seabin and the water then flows out through the bottom of the bin and up into the pump on the dock.
The water then flows through the pump where we have the option of installing an oil/water separator and clean water then flows back into the ocean. This process is constant, operating 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

The Seabin is situated at the water’s surface and is plumbed into a shore based water pump on the dock. The water gets sucked into the Seabin bringing all floating debris and floating liquids into the Seabin. We catch all the floating debris inside the Seabin and the water then flows out through the bottom of the bin and up into the pump on the dock.
The water then flows through the pump where we have the option of installing an oil/water separator and clean water then flows back into the ocean. This process is constant, operating 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.”

They’ve even designed it using sustainable materials and with a ‘natural fiber catch bag’ that catches all the debris without being too big to prevent someone lifting it out and emptying it. But what if it gets full and doesn’t get emptied? No worry, the Seabin will still attract litter towards it and keep it there.

This project is so so critical and by doing the small task of spreading awareness and sharing the link on your social media outlets, you can help clear the seas one Seabin at a time. You can read even more about the Seabin here.

Seren.

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Seabin our Salvation

  1. Pingback: Ocean Science – thursddayaddams

  2. Betty A

    Hopefully it doesn’t suck in fish and other marine life too! That would be gruesome.
    Great article and a common sense solution to a very real problem. I’ll check out the Kickstarter and see if they are still open for funding.

    BA (Arvada Colorado)

    Like

  3. Dear Betty,

    Don’t fret, Seabin don’t suck in any marine life! They state so on their Indiegogo:

    “Q: Do any fish get sucked into the Seabins? What about smaller marine life?

    A: We have never caught a fish or marine animal in 4 years of testing Seabins. We also have a meeting with a marine Biologist on the 22nd Dec to start a study into the microscopic marine life.”

    You can read more here: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/cleaning-the-oceans-one-marina-at-a-time#/

    Like

  4. Pingback: Clean Up Your Act – thursddayaddams

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s